cyllan: (Default)
([personal profile] cyllan Sep. 21st, 2011 02:19 pm)
The Bitling has requested "Spooky Mystery" books for some of her reading. She's handling the 2nd-level reading books with ease, and is doing okay with slightly harder things so long as I'm there to help with some of the unfamiliar words.

So, anyone have any recommendations as to what she can read herself?

Also, we're about to the end of Harry Potter #2, and my mother is also running out of books to read to her, so I'm opening the floor for suggestions on read-aloud books as well. Help! What should I read my daughter?
jadelennox: ¿Dónde está la biblioteca? (liberrian: community)

From: [personal profile] jadelennox


What titles are in the easy / slightly harder lists?
jadelennox: ¿Dónde está la biblioteca? (liberrian: community)

From: [personal profile] jadelennox


it's taken me forever to get to this but that's mostly shame because of how few books I know for this age group. Anyway, I realized I was just turning to the Theodore Geisel Award, so why don't I just send you to the webpage for the 2012 award And 2006-2011. That's everything I know about that reading level in a nutshell.

From: [identity profile] kirbyk.livejournal.com


I recall when I was that age I enjoyed Bunicula and the sequel, The Celery Stalks at Midnight. Vampire rabbit! (But still a vegetarian, because hello, rabbit.) No idea if they're good, but I've seen them still in print and the second one's title still makes me smile.
ext_45721: Rabbit lying on a couch, reading large, antique book of Poe. (Bookish!)

From: [identity profile] caudelac.livejournal.com


Will Third Bunnicula. Will also reccomend:

From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankwiler,
The Keys to the Kingdom (got this series for my 7 YO Godson, both he and mom loved it) -- Garth Nix.

She may also be at an age where Nancy Drew starts being fun, so long as you don't have Objections to those on principle. I loved them, myself, till I grew out of 'em.
Edited Date: 2011-09-21 07:38 pm (UTC)

From: [identity profile] chinook-wind.livejournal.com


The John Bellairs books -- The Dark Secret of Weatherend, The Mansion in the Mist, The Treasure of Alpheus Winterborn ... et cetera. Those are my favorites. :)

From: [identity profile] moosea1.livejournal.com


There's a local author of kids' mysteries named Carole Marsh that my boys enjoy quite a bit. Some of her mysteries are even set in recognizable places. For example, one is set at the Georgia Aquarium.

From: [identity profile] hapersmion.livejournal.com


Since everyone beat me to Bunnicula, you might consider The Wolves of Willoughby Chase. I loved it.

Also, for general reading, here's the list I put together from people's suggestions when this question was being discussed last year. :) http://hapersmion.livejournal.com/233993.html#cutid1

From: [identity profile] hapersmion.livejournal.com


My neighbor, Julia Watts, writes paranormal mysteries for kids, but I think the target audience is a bit older - she deals with issues of racial discrimination, etc.
Maybe for later - http://juliawattsbooks.com/

From: [identity profile] trix1e.livejournal.com


Spiderwick Chronicles, to be read to her, or with her.

From: [identity profile] gamerguy.livejournal.com


An excellent comic book to have her take a look at is Tiny Titans; Welcome To The Treehouse is the first trade paperback. It has simple stories and kiddyfied versions of not only the Teen Titans but tons of other DC heroes.

http://scans-daily.dreamwidth.org/1956354.html?#cutid1
http://scans-daily.dreamwidth.org/1612703.html?#cutid1
http://scans-daily.dreamwidth.org/1074451.html?#cutid1


.

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